Call for blurb submissions: Pitch Slapped is back!

Gosh, folks. It has been a while.

Here are the news: we’re resurrecting “Pitch Slapped,” a series on blurbs and pitches, in which authors send us their blurbs and blurbs-in-progress, and we break them down and offer critique and suggestions.

If you would like us to give your blurb a pecking, shoot us a note at canarypost@gmail.com or use our contact form. If you know someone who’s working on a story, send them (and their blurbs) our way too.

Chirp!

Chirp, where has the summer gone?

Summer is for the non-fiction birds.

This canary has gone off the reservation. Over the last few months, I’ve been off the radar, munching my way through the nonfiction selection of my local library. It’s been a bit of an adventure, but, as the summer winds down, I’m finding myself drifting back to my usual reading roosts in fantasy and science fiction.

But here are some of the highlights from my nonfiction adventures:

 Scent of the Missing: Love and Partnership with a Search-and-Rescue Dog   Hallucinations Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks, and the Hidden Powers of the MindDrunk Tank Pink: And Other Unexpected Forces that Shape How We Think, Feel, and Behave
The Mind's Eye Heads in Beds: A Reckless Memoir of Hotels, Hustles, and So-Called Hospitality The Woman Who Fell from the Sky The Snake Charmer: A Life and Death in Pursuit of Knowledge
Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety  Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty  Salt: A World History The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science
 The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People  Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything Radiation: What It Is, What You Need to Know The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean

My favorites of the bunch:

  The Possibility Dogs: What a Handful of "Unadoptables" Taught Me About Service, Hope, and Healing Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest TrailArgo: How the CIA and Hollywood Pulled Off the Most Audacious Rescue in History
 Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus Design Basics Index: A Graphic Designer's Guide to Designing Effective Compositions, Selecting Dynamic Components & Developing Creative Concepts

And onward! Keep an eye out for some advance reviews and book-chatter goodness.

Canaries, what have you been reading?

[ Small Chirp ] Making a comeback–Artemis Fowl

I was in line at a coffee shop when I got a book-reading tip from my dino-headed canary friend. There was an eighth Artemis Fowl book coming out,  the text message informed me.

“Whaaaat?” I said.

“Your coffee, ma’am,” the guy at the register explained, but that did nothing to clear up my confusion. An eighth book? I thought the Artemis story arc was over with the seventh book?

Then excitement set in. The Artemis Fowl series had it all–wit, adventure, brilliant and vivid characters, and a fun dose of plot action. And now, the series just might be making a comeback with Artemis Fowl and the Last Guardian (July 2012). Continue reading

Readers, today is your last day to vote!

Canaries and Canary Friends!

Come vote for theCanaryReview at Goodreads and support our flock of fluffy yellow birds.

We are up for the Young Adult category in the Independant Book Blogger Awards. If you are a fan and enjoy our blog, please vote for us.

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And we’d love to show you how much we appreciate your support. After you vote, shoot us an email at canarypost@gmail.com. We’ll send you a canary doodle, a first-page review (if you’re an author), a bird-themed limerick, or something else that’s full of fun, feathery awesome. (And if you’ve already voted, have no fear–I have your emails on hand!)

Chirp! Vote now!

Independent Book Blogger Awards

This Week’s Mine Shaft–Upcoming Reviews

Coming this week…

Advance Review of Snuff by Terry Pratchett (Street Date Oct 11, 2011). I’ve been sitting on this book for over a month, and it’s almost time to let this advance review fly. Fly review, fly!

H.E. Ellis, author of The Gods of Asphalt, will be talking about her all-time favorite read–and that one book that deserves to be taken out back and beaten up–in our guest series, Best and Worst.

JediCanary will be taking us on a tour of the 20th Anniversary Edition of Heir to the Empire by Timothy Zahn and all the reasons it’s a must have.

Robin has told you all about it, but now, we’ll be giving you our side of the story. This Friday’s Pitch Slapped article will be a peek behind the scenes at our revision process.

If you’d like a heads up when we post, subscribe to The Canary Review or follow us on Twitter!

What are we reading?

JediCanary: The Hunger Games Trilogy (YA, Dystopia)

CanaryTheFirst:  Beka Cooper: Terrier by Tamora Pierce (YA, Fantasy) and Infidel by Kameron Hurley (Fantasy)

TheOtherCanary:  Maine by J. Courtney Sullivan (Lit Fic)

What’s on your reading list?


[Book Review] Sometimes an Elephant is Just an Elephant

Meg’s Review: Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

(If you feel like hacking a canary, then 3.5.)

My mother’s not an avid reader, but when she finds something she likes she proceeds to force it upon everyone. And by everyone, I mean me. The format has worked well in the past (I may not have ever read Harry Potter had she not bought the books and locked me in my room to read them), so when she started harping on about Water for Elephants, I assumed it would be another terrific find.

And it might be. Or it might not. I can’t decide. Water for Elephants has got my feathery panties in a twist; I still can’t figure out if it was a good book or simply a fluff book hiding under the cape of capital-L Literature.

The story is narrated by the 90-something Jacob Jankowski, as he recalls his twenties. The majority of the plot revolves around the sudden death of his parents, which indirectly leads him to join the circus. The words ‘joining the circus’ should send up red flags; after all, nothing but ridiculous shenanigans (or crazy killer clowns) have ever followed the phrase. But I will say one thing about Gruen’s writing: she keeps things grounded. When big, over-the-top events are happening, the narrative is so firmly controlled by Jacob’s thoughts and emotions that the story never runs away from the author completely.  That’s quite a feat considering the ending, which caught me by delightful surprise.

However, I have issues with said narrator. Continue reading